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Time and Tide Bell ~ #200Fish

A Continuing Arts Programme facing Lincolnshire's Coast

#200Fish is a community project to create works of art based on each of the species of fish found in the North Sea

To learn more and find out how to join the project click here.

Fish #204 Megrim Lepidorhombus whiffiagonis ~ Gill Baker

Acrylic 28 x 35 cm

Megrim

Interestingly,according to Oxford Dictionaies there are several definitions for Megrim:

As a fish, it is a left eyed flatfish, sometimes called a whiff. It is found in the Atlantic and Mediterranean, usually between 100 to 700m below sea level. The Megrim rarely is found in water shallower than 50m. It is abundant off the Cornish coast. It spawns in deep water off Iceland and the west of Ireland. It can grow to 60cm (24") long, up to 4lbs in weight. It has a larger head and narrower body than most flatfish. It is light brown with dark spots and prefers a sandy or muddy sea floor, avoiding weeds. It preys on small fish, squid and crustaceans. In turn, the Megrim is eaten by sharks, seal and large cod.(Wikipedia)
The Marine Conservation Society is promoting the Megrim in the 2018 Good Fish Guide. Along with others such as dab, pollack, hake and herring, this plentiful fish should be eaten to boost the UK fishing industry. It is related to the Lemon and Dover sole, and although not as delicate or refined in texture, holds a pleasant flavour. Currently, most Megrim caught in UK waters are sold to Spain and France. In this country, there have been efforts to encourage the public to choose it as an alternative to the more familiar names we see in fish shops. Sainsbuty's supermarket chain featured the Megrim in its 'Switch the fish' campaign. In the West of England, it is referred to as the 'Cornish Sole' to boost its popularity. It is found in healthy numbers so it can be harvested sustainably. You can grill, fry, bake or poach the Megrim, and a recommended recipe serves it pan fried in lemon and butter, or in a tomato sauce. Delicious!

About the Artist
Gill Baker retired from full time employment in 2015 and now spends much of her time painting. She enjoys working alongside others in local art groups and shows her work in joint exhibitions several times a year. Gill paints mainly in acrylic and oil, and finds this an ideal way to relax. Inspiration is drawn from the countryside and coast near to her home in Kent.


Fish #204 Megrim Lepidorhombus whiffiagonis ~ Edward Adlington

Photo etching 34 x 59 cm


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Lincolnshire Time and Tide Bell Community Interest Company is a not-for profit organisation, registered at Companies House. Company Number 10934941